What is Sick Sinus Syndrome? — Get to Know Sick Sinus Syndrome

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You must be wondering what is sick sinus syndrome. It is the sinus node malfunctioning, ultimately slowing down your heat beat (bradycardia) or in other words the pacemaker does not perform its work properly. The pumping becomes meager thereby weakening the circulation. The sinusitis node is otherwise called the natural pacemaker. It results in irregular heart beats termed as arrhythmias.

What are Sick Sinus Syndrome warning signs?

The warning sign could be anywhere between dizziness, unconsciousness, confusion and heart malfunctioning due to problems with the sinus node. If you are scared that you have got one, you should know what sick sinus syndrome is. It makes your heart beat faster or slower than the regular beat. At times there is an uncommon gap between the two beats. Even medicines could start one this syndrome. It is usually associated with old age. Old people are more prone to the disease than young ones.

Syncope, pre-syncope, palpitations and dizziness is commonly associated with this syndrome. Even stokes are common called «Adams attacks». You could experience chest pains as the blood supply is reduced. The patient gets exhausted soon because of low energy level due to shortness of breath. Headaches are usually associated due to shortage of blood flow to the head. There are numerous signs like sinus arrest, irregular patterns of bradycardia and tachycardia and senatorial blocks. It is at times very difficult to pin point the problem due to indefinable findings and vague indicator on electrocardiogram or Holter monitor.

So, what is Sick Sinus Syndrome treatment? It could be diagnosed by electrocardiogram (ECG). It can be treated by a drug called calcium antagonists. A person affected by this syndrome can go for pacemaker therapy. A permanent pacemaker placement is also recommended in this case. The foundation of the treatment is atrial or dual-chamber pacemaker replacement, which gives you relief from heart attacks, thromboembolic events and mortality in contrast with ventricular pacemakers.



Jaren Jackson